data center

About Us

100G Lambda MSA is an industry consortium with a common focus to provide a new set of optical interface specifications, developed around an optical channel data rate of 100Gb/s. These specifications are targeted for 100GE and 400GE applications to be used as cost effective solution for high density multi-Terabit Switching, Routing and Transport networks.

Features

100G Lambda MSA defines 100G PAM-4 optical signaling and encoding, FEC and link characteristics for 100G and 400G applications using 100Gb/s per optical channel for 2km and 10km reaches. The MSA will leverage the IEEE 802.3 draft specifications and methodology for similar 100 Gb/s single channel specifications over 500m of single-mode fiber – specifically 100GBASE-DR and 400GBASE-DR4. The MSA specifications will be consistent with the IEEE specifications in PAM4 signaling and RS (544, 514) FEC to maintain compatibility with existing system and PHY technology currently under development.

Benefits

Currently, the most popular 100Gb/s optical standards such as 100GBASE-LR4, 100G-CWDM4, 100G-PSM4, rely on 25 Gb/s optical lanes that align with 25Gb/s SERDES commonly used on ASICs for the switching, routing and transport applications. As ASIC SERDES increase in speed, it is necessary to increase the optical channel speeds to avoid additional cost that comes from needing to translate to slower speeds. Cost savings can further be realized by reducing the number of optical lanes and increasing the speed from four times 25Gb/s per lane to a single lane of 100Gb/s. It has been recognized by the IEEE and the members of this MSA that a single optical lane of 100Gb/s can be at least 40% lower cost than four lanes of 25G. The MSA members expect 400 Gb/s specifications defined by the MSA using 100Gb/s per optical channel will be much more conducive to high density, and lower cost, implementations in module form factors and networking systems.

News

  • 100G Lambda MSA to Define Specification for Next Generation Optical Links

    Twenty-two industry leaders join forces to accelerate industry specification of 100 Gbps per wavelength optical specifications San Jose, California – September 12, 2017 — The 100G Lambda Multi-Source Agreement (MSA) Group has announced their intent to develop specifications based on 100 Gbps per wavelength optical technology. Under the MSA, participating companies are addressing the technical challenges of achieving optical interfaces utilizing 100 Gbps per wavelength technology ensuring optical interoperability for transceivers and interfaces produced by different manufacturers and in various form factors. These new optical specifications target the next generation of networking equipment that is required to address the industry’s ever-growing need for bandwidth.

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Promoters

alibaba aristabroadcomcienaciscofinisarFoxconnFITinphiinteljuniperlumentumluxteramacommaxlinearmicrosoftmolexNeoPhotonicsnokiaoclarosemtechsourcesumitomo

Frequently Asked Questions

  • 1 Q: WHAT WILL THE 100G LAMBDA MSA GROUP DEFINE?
    • A: The 100G Lambda MSA Group will define the next generation of optical interfaces that address the industry’s need for low cost client high speed interfaces. Specifically, specifications based on 100 Gb/s per optical channel technology to be used in client interfaces for Ethernet switching, routing and transport applications.
  • 2 Q: WHO ARE THE MEMBERS OF 100G LAMBDA MSA?
    • A: The 100G Lambda Specification will be developed and refined by the members of the MSA representing a broad industry outlook and focus for lower cost higher speed optical interfaces to meet industry traffic demands. Twenty two Promoter companies, spanning all aspects of the networking ecosystem, are working towards developing common specifications. Promoter members include: Alibaba, Arista Networks, Broadcom, Ciena, Cisco, Finisar, Foxconn Interconnect Technology, Inphi, Intel, Juniper Networks, Lumentum, Luxtera, MACOM, MaxLinear, Microsoft, Molex, NeoPhotonics, Nokia, Oclaro, Semtech, Source Photonics, and Sumitomo Electric.
  • 3 Q: WHAT ARE THE KEY FEATURES?
    • A: In its first phase, the MSA will define specifications for 100 Gb/s single wavelength links over 2km and 10km of single-mode fiber and 400 Gb/s links, based on four wavelengths of 100 Gb/s per optical channel technology, over 2km of single-mode fiber. Subsequently the MSA intends to continue its work to develop a 400 Gb/s link over 10km of single-mode fiber. The MSA will leverage the IEEE 802.3 draft specifications and methodology for similar 100 Gb/s single channel specifications over 500m of single-mode fiber – specifically 100GBASE-DR and 400GBASE-DR4. The MSA specifications will be consistent with the IEEE specifications in PAM4 signaling and RS (544, 514) FEC to maintain compatibility with existing system and PHY technology currently under development.
  • 4 Q: WHY DOES THE INDUSTRY NEED ANOTHER 100G OPTICAL STANDARD?
    • A: Currently, the most popular 100Gb/s optical standards such as 100GBASE-LR4, 100G-CWDM4, 100G-PSM4, rely on 25 Gb/s optical lanes that align with 25Gb/s SERDES commonly used on ASICs for the switching, routing and transport applications. As ASIC SERDES increase in speed, it is necessary to increase the optical channel speeds to avoid additional cost that comes from needing to translate to slower speeds. Cost savings can further be realized by reducing the number of optical lanes and increasing the speed from four times 25Gb/s per lane to a single lane of 100Gb/s. It has been recognized by the IEEE and the members of this MSA that a single optical lane of 100Gb/s can be at least 40% lower cost than four lanes of 25G. It also sets the stage for interfaces at 400G using 100Gb/s per optical channel increments.
    • The MSA will also set specifications for 400Gb/s as well. The IEEE has already defined standards at 400Gb/s for 500m (400GBASE-DR4), 2km (400BASE-FR8) and 10km (400GBASE-LR8). FR8 and LR8 use eight tightly spaced wavelengths operating at 50 Gb/s that are then multiplexed onto a duplex SMF. Supporting 8 optical channels in high density form factors (such as QSFP-DD and OSFP) is challenging from a cost, size, power and thermal perspective. The MSA members expect 400 Gb/s specifications defined by the MSA using 100Gb/s per optical channel will be much more conducive to high density, and lower cost, implementations in module form factors and networking systems.
  • 5 Q: WHAT DOES THE 100G LAMBDA SPECIFICATION DEFINE?
    • A: The 100G Lambda specification defines the 100G PAM-4 optical signaling and encoding, FEC and link characteristics for 100G and 400G applications using 100Gb/s per optical channel for 2km and 10km reaches. It does not define a physical form factor or electrical interface.
  • 6 Q: WHAT IS THE NAMING OF THE NEW SPECIFICATIONS GOING TO BE?
    • A: The following naming will be used for the specifications developed by the MSA:
      ■ 100Gb/s over 2km SMF: 100G-FR
      ■ 100Gb/s over 10km SMF: 100G-LR
      ■ 400Gb/s over 2km SMF: 400G-FR4
  • 7 Q: IS THE 100G LAMBDA MSA DEPENDENT ON OTHER OUTSIDE STANDARDS OR MSA ACTIVITIES?
    • A: It is anticipated that the interfaces will be compatible with IEEE 802.3’s 100GBASE-DR and 400GBASE-DR4 specifications.The optical interfaces defined by the MSA are expected to be implementable in common industry form factor MSAs such as QSFP28 for 100 Gb/s and QSFP-DD or OSFP for 400 Gb/s.
  • 8 Q: WHAT ABOUT THE IEEE? WHY HAS THE MSA FORMED RATHER THAN DOING THIS IN THE IEEE?
    • A: The MSA members recognize the value having optical interfaces being defined in IEEE specifications for their long term utility and adoption by the industry. The MSA members, seeing the short term industry need to establish some industry specifications quickly, decided to work together to enable rapid dissemination of common specs across the industry. The members expect that the IEEE will initiate development of these important industry specifications in the future and therefore the MSA members have chosen to very closely follow IEEE methodologies in their technical work with the hope that when the IEEE initiates its work, they will be able to strongly leverage the work of the MSA.
  • 9 Q: IS THIS MSA FOR CLIENT-SIDE INTERFACES OR LINE-SIDE (LONG DISTANCE) INTERFACES?
    • A: At this time the MSA only plans to define specifications for 2km and 10km client interfaces. There are currently no plans to define specifications for DCI or coherent optical interfaces.
  • 10 Q: WILL THE MSA WAIT TO RELEASE ALL THE SPECIFICATIONS AT ONCE?
    • A: No, the MSA will begin to work on the 100 Gb/s specifications and the 2km 400 Gb/s specification first and publically release them as they are near completion. It may be possible that a specification will go through more than one revision after release. It is anticipated that a subsequent release would focus on introducing a 400 Gb/s 10km specification based on an 100Gb/s per optical channel interface.
  • 11 Q: WILL THE MSA DEFINE SPEED BEYOND 400G?
    • A: At this time, the MSA has not made any plans to define specifications beyond 400 Gb/s, however the MSA technology using 100Gb/s per optical channel is scalable to higher aggregate bandwidth. The MSA could consider extending the scope of the MSA charter by a majority vote of the founding members decided.
  • 12 Q: WHEN WILL THE FIRST SPECIFICATIONS BE RELEASED?
    • A: The MSA anticipates that the first specification will be publicly released before the end of 2017.
  • 13 Q: WHEN WILL THE MSA COMPLETE THE 100G AND 400G SPECIFICATIONS IN THE CURRENT CHARTER?
    • A: It is anticipated that the final specifications will be complete before mid-2018.
  • 14 Q: DOES THE 100Gb/s PER OPTICAL CHANNEL MSA REQUIRE A SPECIFIC TECHNOLOGY SUCH AS SILICON PHOTONICS?
    • A: No, The MSA is technology agnostic. The MSA membership is well represented across component suppliers, module manufacturers, system provider and end users who are working to ensure that any viable technology that could be used has been considered while developing the specifications. This broad technology and industry view ensures that multiple technically robust and low cost solutions will be available to the market.
  • 15 Q: HOW DO I JOIN THE MSA OR FIND OUT MORE INFORMATION?
    • A: The membership of the MSA is currently limited to the initial Promoter members so that they can make rapid progress and publish the first draft of the MSA specifications publicly as soon as possible. Once this has happened, the MSA will open up its membership to Contributor members to join. For more information, please contact info@100GLambda.com.